Court of Protection Solicitors

Court of Protection Solicitors London

Our Court of Protection lawyers are highly experienced in supporting vulnerable people and their loved ones sensitively and effectively.

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  • “The agile team at Osbornes acts for a wide range of high-net-worth individuals and families in complex estate and trust litigation, advising on a wide array of contentious trust and estate matters.”

  • “Jan is an expert in international probate work and is praised for a sensible and pragmatic approach to cases.”

What is the Court of Protection?

The Court of Protection is a specialist court in England and Wales tasked with making decisions in the best interests of those who lack the mental capacity to make those decisions for themselves.

The decisions we’re talking about are those relating to the person’s health, welfare or financial matters – or a combination of them, depending on their individual needs. For example, the Court can make a decision as to whether an individual should have medical treatment, or permitting a cash sum to be spent for a specific purpose or whether a statutory will should be made.

The Court of Protection also has a vital judicial role, in deciding disputes that have arisen relating to an individual who lacks mental capacity.

The Court also appoints deputies to manage someone’s affairs. Deputies are trusted individuals who are given legal authority to make important healthcare or financial decisions for the individual on an ongoing basis.

The Court of Protection’s responsibilities also includes making decisions on:

  • Lasting Powers of Attorney and considering objections to the registration of them
  • Depriving someone of their liberty under the Mental Capacity Act 205

How Osbornes Law can help

If you’re concerned about a loved one who you believe is unable to make a decision for themselves, get in touch with us for immediate support. Our skilled Court of Protection lawyers understand that your situation may be difficult and distressing. We approach each individual case with empathy and compassion.

In most cases, we will have a detailed discussion with you before advising whether a court application is required to protect your loved one’s interests. This may necessitate an urgent court application where an emergency decision needs to be made. We’re not afraid to act robustly if your loved one’s best interests require it.

We are also experienced in guiding deputies and attorneys as to how they can effectively exercise their decision-making powers on behalf of an individual.

Our skilled team of Court of Protection solicitors will guide you through the issues you’re facing and sensitively advise you on what your best next steps might look like.

Who our Court of Protection Solicitors can help

Our Court of Protection lawyers are experienced in helping anyone with the responsibility of managing and looking after someone’s affairs. We advise and support:

  • Concerned relatives worried about a loved one’s ability to make their own decisions and choices. You may feel uneasy because they are making decisions that are not safe or financially wise.
  • Relatives whose loved one has been diagnosed with dementia or Alzheimer’s or has suffered serious injury and cannot make decisions for themselves.
  • Deputies and those with authority under a Lasting Power of Attorney to make decisions on behalf of a loved one. You may, for example, be concerned about what decisions to take and how to implement them.
  • Deputies and attorneys who feel unable to continue managing a person’s affairs. There are times when having such a responsibility for someone’s welfare becomes too burdensome, whether because of a change in circumstances or because a dispute has arisen.
  • Deputies, attorneys and family members involved in disputes concerning a loved one who lacks the capacity to make their own decisions. No one wants to be involved in disputes involving a vulnerable relative who needs family support more than anything. We understand this. Our specialist court of protection lawyers are experienced in advising how best to approach disputes to enable a swift but calm resolution.

Court of Protection Deputy Applications

The Court can appoint someone as a deputy for an individual who lacks the capacity to make decisions for themselves. We will discuss the background and your loved one’s situation and needs before advising what should happen. It’s wise to talk to the individual about your concerns and your desire to help them in this way.

There are two types of deputy (your loved one may need a deputy for both):

  • Personal welfare – The deputy has the authority to make decisions about the individual’s medical treatment and healthcare and how they are looked after.
  • Property and financial affairs – The deputy has the authority to pay bills and deal with other financial matters, such as pensions and benefits.

Assuming you satisfy the legal requirements, we can make an application on your behalf to the Court of Protection. Once we submit the application(s), there is a two-week period for others to object to your appointment. That could, for instance, be a family member or even the individual themselves. If an objection is lodged, a hearing may be necessary.

If no objection is raised, the Court will assess the application and inform us of the next steps which will involve your loved one being personally notified and a deputy bond being put in place.

Assuming the application is approved, you will formally be appointed as deputy and you will then be required to take further administrative steps. We will discuss these steps with you, along with what your role as a deputy means in practice.

Please note that deputyship orders for personal welfare matters are more difficult to obtain and it may be that a specific issue order is more appropriate to resolve the issue at hand.

Acting as a Professional Deputy

A sensible option preferred by many families is appointing a professional deputy. A professional deputy is typically a specialist solicitor experienced in Court of Protection work, who is appointed to manage the property and financial affairs of someone who lacks the mental capacity to make their own decisions.

Professional deputies are best placed to manage the affairs of someone in more complex situations and ease the burden on their family and/or close friends. Our specialist team includes experienced professional deputies and attorneys helping many vulnerable clients who need a trusted decision-maker.

It’s less common for a solicitor to be appointed as a personal welfare deputy as this is usually the natural remit of close family.

Support for Deputies or Attorneys

Acting as a deputy or attorney can be an overwhelming responsibility at times, however much you care for the individual, which is partly why professional deputies are so well-placed. For individual deputies, there is help and support available.

Deputies are required to take certain specific steps such as notifying the banks/building societies, pension providers, DWP, HMRC, care home, local authorities etc. The deputy may also want to open a separate bank account to deal with the financial matters of their loved one rather than using that person’s own bank account going forward.

Thankfully, a raft of information is available, including a code of practice that accompanies the Mental Capacity Act 2005. Our specialist team are also on hand to guide and support you.

Making a Statutory Will

Individuals who are unable to make certain decisions for themselves, may well not have the capacity to make a will. In this situation, the Court of Protection can make a ‘statutory will’ (or change their existing will).

Statutory wills are a protective measure to ensure the estate passes on death to those the individual would have chosen had they been able to make their own will. A statutory will has the same effect as if the individual made it themselves in the traditional way.

We can ask the Court to make a statutory will if you are a deputy or attorney. However, it’s important to understand that the Court will only make one if it is in the individual’s best interests. As we would be expected to present the proposed will to the Court, we will need full details of your loved one’s financial and family situation so that we can determine who they would want to inherit in the event of their death.

If the Court approves the proposed will, you will be able to sign it on your loved one’s behalf. It will then be legally binding. It is also a requirement that they will be returned to the Court for sealing.

Contact us today

For a free initial conversation call 020 7485 8811

Email us Send us an email and we’ll get back to you






    • Excellent and prompt service from Andrew Watson.

      Family Department Client

    • You appear to have solved the problems of the estate. My thanks for all you have done for us.

      Wills & Probate department client

    • “Maria Kitsiou has excellent interpersonal skills and is very efficient. Her tireless dedication and hard work is appreciated.”

      Client review

    • "Osbornes team is noted for cross-practice expertise in areas such as housing and community care, which it brings to bear in disrepair, possession and homelessness cases involving vulnerable adults, individuals with language difficulties, the elderly and those with no recourse to public funds."

      The Legal 500

    • "A sensible senior practitioner with a tremendous wealth of experience and excellent judgement."

      Chambers UK

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